James Madison

James Madison was the 4th President of the United States. He was a founding father, and considered a political philosopher, and the “Father of the Constitution” and the “Bill of Rights”.

He “occupied” west Florida.
Because he worried that the situation in Europe could result in England or France taking parts of Florida away from the Spanish, President Madison orders officials to take possession of West Florida. The President emphasizes that the area was officially part of the Louisiana territory acquired by the United States in 1803, and he fears that the surrounding areas were in danger from the chaos in West Florida.

By 1815, the United States had been at war with pirates of North Africa and their sponsoring potentates for more than 30 years.

Four American presidents–George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison–had paid tribute to various Arab leaders, negotiated contracts and treaties, endured the hostage-taking or enslavement of some 700 Americans and the capture of 35 American ships, and paid millions of dollars in tribute and ransom to secure the freeing of American hostages.

In 1815, not long after the war with Britain, Madison ordered commander Stephen Decatur to head a 10-ship expedition against the Barbary pirate regimes of North Africa and threaten them with “serious disaster” if they did not agree to a “just and lasting peace.” The Arab leaders, or deys, complied.

In his State of the Union message to Congress on Dec. 5, 1815 (the termed merely the two-term president’s seventh annual message to Congress), Madison began his message with unrestrained boasts about the first war the United States had won abroad, the first war it fought in the Middle East–and still the only war it has ever won outright in the Middle East.

Now some Madison quotes. I am not finding specific letters etc like I have with Washington, Jefferson, or Adams. Please forgive the lack of exactness Ocean Cat.

“With respect to the words general welfare, I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators.”

“A]ll power is originally vested in, and consequently derived from, the people. That government is instituted and ought to be exercised for the benefit of the people; which consists in the enjoyment of life and liberty and the right of acquiring property, and generally of pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety. That the people have an indubitable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to reform or change their government whenever it be found adverse or inadequate to the purpose of its institution.”

I wonder where this came from?
“The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; a well armed and well regulated militia being the best security of a free country; but no person religiously scrupulous of bearing arms shall be compelled to render military service in person.”

“Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an ailment without which it instantly expires. But it could not be less folly to abolish liberty, which is essential to political life, because it nourishes faction than it would be to wish the annihilation of air, which is essential to animal life, because it imparts to fire its destructive agency.”

A government that does not trust it’s law-abiding citizens to keep and bear arms is itself unworthy of trust.
heheh

“If Congress can employ money indefinitely to the general welfare, and are the sole and supreme judges of the general welfare, they may take the care of religion into their own hands; they may appoint teachers in every State, county and parish and pay them out of their public treasury; they may take into their own hands the education of children, establishing in like manner schools throughout the Union; they may assume the provision of the poor; they may undertake the regulation of all roads other than post-roads; in short, every thing, from the highest object of state legislation down to the most minute object of police, would be thrown under the power of Congress… Were the power of Congress to be established in the latitude contended for, it would subvert the very foundations, and transmute the very nature of the limited Government established by the people of America

Ouch!

WOW!
“We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future …upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God.”

“All men having power ought to be mistrusted.”

That is all for all.
V

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4 Comments on “James Madison”

  1. Car in Says:

    We need James Madison here. NOW.

    “With respect to the words general welfare, I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators.”

    BINGO. Exactly what’s happened.

  2. Vmaximus Says:

    That quote struck me too Carin. It is the democrats only hope to get crap like “health care” through.

  3. Vmaximus Says:

    Sorry I kilt it deader than dead Carin.

  4. Car in Says:

    You didn’t kilt it. Weekends are dead.


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